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How to keep your house warm in subfreezing temperatures

How to keep your house warm in sub freezing temperatures (Photo: KHQA)

While historical houses are often what many Tri-State residents love to call home, they're not quite so cozy in the winter cold, especially once your utility bills start heating up. Those old windows and doors could be blowing more of your money this winter, as cold air leaks into your home through old seals.

Your heater works hard to keep your house warm, Adam Peters from Peters Heating and Air says, if it just isn't keeping you warm, it might be time for it to be replaced.

We would normal say probably 15 to 20 years is what you should get out of a furnace.," said Peters.

While we all have that frugal furnace fanatic in our lives, turning the heat off while you're away from home may actually cost you more than the few bucks you thought you might save.

It kind of depends on the system you have. If you have a heat pump system you are better off letting that run all day long on your normal temperature setting. Otherwise, you might have to run electric heat for it to catch back up. Which is very expensive to run," said Peters.

Feeling a cold draft? Brad Heming from Doors-N-More says your wooden window frames might be to blame.

There are no weather stripping around those windows. So, there is just a wood frame and a wood sash. So, there really isn't anything that really seals the cold air from coming in," said Heming.

While keeping your blinds closed can reduce a draft to an extent, locking your windows might do even more.

So, when you close your windows make sure they are locked. Because when you put them in the lock position. It pulls the window sash into the weather stripping to make sure they are sealed tight," said Heming.

It's not just our windows, if you can see sunlight through the cracks in your door, that's where cold air is seeping in too.

We will also have door sweeps that we can put on the bottom of the door to insure a tight seal across the bottom," said Heming.

Another easy fix, lining your windows and doors with weather strips to cut back on the drafts.

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