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      Farmers need 80 degrees and no rain for awhile

      If farmers in the Tri-State area had one wish, it would probably be for the rain to let up for awhile.

      Many say two weeks of sun, wind and warm temperatures is just what farmers want to see in order to get their crops planted.

      Many fields in the Tri-State area are way t oo wet from recent rains to do anything. But depending on where you are some farmers have managed to get in a few acres of corn, but the unplanted fields far outweigh the planted fields.

      Y ou know it's not too late we'd like to get corn planted in a timely fashion to avoid heat in July and August when the corn in pollinating, that's what we try to grow corn earlier or get it planted earlier. But who knows what the weather is going to be from here on out, we could have a nice cool summer," University of Illinois crop specialist Mike Roegge said.

      Roegge said West Central Illinois got about three inches of rain late last week. And he says we're at point that the total rainfall for the year is about five inches above normal and that isn't good for letting farmers into their fields. But he says there is still a small window of opportunity.

      Alan Ippensen farms about 500 acres west and north of Quincy and he says he's been able to plant some corn, but a majority of fields are still too wet and that is starting to make some producers a little nervous.

      "We'll get there this week if it rains again, there will be a lot of guys getting nervous I know a lot of people didn't plant because of the forecast last week being cold and wet, So there will be a lot of guys getting pretty antsy by the end of this week if it rains again," Ippensen said.

      But with that in mind, Roegge said what farmer's need now is about a week of 80 degree temperatures, winds out of the south and most importantly, no rain, so this can look like this and have thousands of acres of corn in the ground.

      Roegge also said there is an average of 150,000 acres of corn planted each year in Adams County.

      Only about 2,000 acres have been planted so far this year because of the cold, wet weather.