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The Latest: Jury selection moving methodically for Greitens

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ST. LOUIS (AP) -- The Latest on investigations into Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens (all times local):

3 p.m.

Jury selection has been moving slowly and methodically in the criminal trial of Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens.

More than half of the prospective jurors are being dismissed, either because of time constraints or potential biases. The selection process now is expected to go into Tuesday.

Legal experts say it's not usual for jury selection to move slowly in high-profile cases. Jurors aren't required to know nothing about the allegations against Greitens. But his attorneys have been trying to exclude those who may have difficulty setting aside their opinions.

Greitens is charged with felony invasion of privacy for allegedly taking and transmitting a photo of an at least partially nude woman without her consent in 2015.

The Republican governor has acknowledged having an affair but denied criminal wrongdoing.

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1:49 p.m.

An attorney for Gov. Eric Greitens' campaign has turned over more than 14,000 documents to a House investigatory committee but is objecting to a subpoena issued to a separate secretive group that has supported Greitens' agenda.

Attorney Catherine Hanaway said Monday that she doesn't believe the committee called A New Missouri falls within the scope of the House investigation.

House investigatory committee chairman Jay Barnes said it's considering its options for how to enforce the subpoena.

The House investigation could eventually lead to impeachment proceedings against Greitens but is separate from his criminal trial underway this week in St. Louis on an invasion-of-privacy charge.

The House panel issued subpoenas after Hanaway complained it hadn't sought the campaign's input before releasing a report May 2 about Greitens' political use of a charity donor list.

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1:19 p.m.

A special House committee investigating Gov. Eric Greitens says it has received some but not all of the documents it requested from the governor's political committees.

Committee Chairman Jay Barnes said Monday that the House had issued subpoenas for documents and testimony from Greitens' campaign committee, former campaign manager Austin Chambers and a secretive committee called "A New Missouri" that has supported Greitens' agenda.

Barnes said a Greitens attorney supplied a "substantial number" of documents but also objected to providing "other large categories of documents."

The House investigation is separate from Greitens' criminal trial on invasion of privacy.

The House panel issued subpoenas after a Greitens' campaign attorney complained the panel hadn't sought its input before releasing a report about Greitens' political use of a charity donor list.

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10:15 a.m.

A lawyer for Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens says prosecutors have stopped looking for the photo in connection with his felony invasion of privacy trial, a contention a prosecutor did not dispute in court.

The charge against Greitens stems from his allegedly taking and transmitting a photo of a partially nude woman during a sexual encounter in 2015. Prosecutors have acknowledged that they did not have the photo but left open the possibility that they would obtain it.

Defense lawyer Jim Martin said Monday that the circuit attorney's office told Greitens' team Friday that they had obtained information from the cloud but did not have a photo. Martin said prosecutors said they had stopped pursuing a photo.

Judge Rex Burlison asked prosecutor Ronald Sullivan if he had a response to the defense's contention, and he said he did not.

Jury selection continues Monday.

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1 a.m.

Jury selection is taking longer than expected in the criminal trial of Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens.

Opening arguments had been expected to begin Monday. Instead, attorneys who began screening 160 prospective jurors last week are to continuing doing so Monday. And that process is now expected to last into Tuesday.

Greitens is charged with felony invasion of privacy for allegedly taking and transmitting a photo of a woman in a compromising position without her permission in March 2015.The Republican governor has denied any criminal wrongdoing but has acknowledged having an extramarital affair with the woman. He hasn't directly answered questions about whether he took the photo.

The affair ended more than a year before Greitens won election in November 2016.

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