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      Two sides of keeping it cool

      Record setting temperatures blanket the Tri-States and that's forced area workers to make some changes to beat the heat.

      "Every year, some years are cool, some years are hot, but they're all workable and nothing out of the ordinary for us," Kevin Rees said.

      It's business as usual for Rees on his construction site. He says even 100 plus degree weather doesn't stop him and his crew from working. Still he's taking precautions to keep them safe.

      "We do take more breaks than usual and we do find shade up to three or four times a day just to take a break and get a drink and get back at it," Rees said.

      But the heat isn't only effecting outside workers.

      "When I got outside after work I'm out there for about 20 minutes and it wears me down, I'm pretty tired," Michael Trone, Dot Foods frozen warehouse employee said. "Just as soon as I get home from work I'm just tired because I've been freezing all day."

      Dot Foods frozen warehouse employees feel winter-like temps inside all year round ranging from 32 degrees to negative five degrees. During summer months when temperatures outside are at the hottest, employees need to be extra cautious.

      "Just the shock from one extreme to the next can put your body into shock," Natalie Zimmerman, Dot Foods occupational health trainer said.

      Still, whether you're going from the cold to the heat or working in the heat all day, staying hydrated is a priority.

      And even with the dangers heat brings, some workers still don't mind a hot summer day.

      "Cold is harder for us than the heat, honestly," Rees said.

      "In the winter time it's just kind of depressing cause it's cold and then you go outside and it's cold again so I like it when it's cold and hot," Trone said.