75
      Sunday
      86 / 67
      Monday
      89 / 71
      Tuesday
      91 / 70

      Tri-States students learn that actions have consequences

      No one was really hurt or injured, but the display that emergency responders put on may prevent teens from being seriously injured in the future

      Fire trucks, police cars, and ambulances poured in behind Central High School in Camp Point Wednesday afternoon.

      No one was really hurt or injured, but the display that emergency responders put on may prevent teens from being seriously injured in the future.

      A drunk driving crash simulation showed the step by step process that first responders must go through to treat victims and handle the scene of a crash.

      "It was a big eye opener. I didn't know what it was like to go through that and the coroner really opened my eyes about how to inform a family that ... what he has to do," Hunter Fundel, one of the students who attended the display said.

      After students watched their classmates get cut out of wrecked cars and either put in an ambulance or slid into a body bag, speakers explained how drunk and distracted driving affects them everyday.

      "The hardest part when we come up on a scene is when we have to inform a family that their loved one has passed away, and when we have to go tell a family that they have lost a loved one ... hearing a family's screams ... hearing their reactions. It's very difficult," Jim Keller, Adams County coroner said.

      Keller explained to students how the decisions they make when they get behind the wheel of a car could be their last.

      "We handle about 5-6 hundred DUI cases a year.which is too many, and unfortunately accidents happen and people die," Jennifer Cifaldi, an assistant state's attorney said, "If we can get one student out here to hear our message and change their thinking then all of this was worth it."

      The simulation was put on by the local chapter of ThinkFirst National Injury Prevention Foundation.