77
      Sunday
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      Traveling back in time in the Tri-States

      Two warriors battling at the Tri-States Renaissance Fair

      The Tri-States got a taste of medieval life over the weekend.

      The annual Renaissance Faire sprawled across Rand Park in Keokuk.

      Visitors got to see things they would not get the chance to see anywhere else.

      Sword fighting proved to be one of the most popular displays at the fair, drawing in some loyal fans.

      "Awesome! I think everything that I've seen is awesome," Colbin West, a young fan of the faire said. He tried out several different displays, including the bounce house and re-enactment of the Harry Potter themed "Quidditch" match, but he was most enthralled by the knights.

      "We normally fight for the honor of something, either our king or our lady, but sometimes we fight for the honor of the crowd," Bo Ring said. Ring is also known as "Sir Ixtilix Ochitl" and was one of the knights demonstrating various types of fighting from the middle ages.

      The fighting tactics that were demonstrated very accurately depict those used in Medieval times, something these fair-goers say you wont see in movies.

      "It's good for show and it makes a good theme, but fights lasted seconds," Bob Ritter explained . During his time as "Lord Roibhilin of Adair," he showed the crowd some self defense techniques using a cape. Ritter noted that the sword fights seem to attract the biggest crowds in the shortest amount of time.

      "Our fighting is non-choreographed. That makes us different from most other performers," Ring added.

      A day out at the renaissance faire is still the best entertainment they can think of, even when compared with modern video games.

      "You're doing it for real out here. It takes real energy, real strength. It builds real muscles, and it builds character," Ring said.

      "I've been interested in the middle ages for a long, long time and now I get to relive part of it," Ritter said.

      If you missed this Renaissance Faire, but you're interested in the middle ages, check out the Society for Creative Ananchronism.