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      Toys pulled from shelf because of toxic cadmium

      One of the necklaces laced with cadmium. / CBS News

      Toys are being pulled off store shelves after reports of a new, more dangerous toxin has been found in U-S toys.

      We told you last night here on KHQA of toys made in China now containing cadmium instead of lead.

      You may recall lead was banned from being used to make toys in 2008.

      The CDC lists cadmium as the seventh most dangerous compound because it can cause cancer, lead to brain development problems, and cause kidney failure.

      If you missed last night's story, click here:

      Here are some of the specific toys being pulled in your Safe Family report.

      Wal-Mart and Claire's have both pulled any jewelry that may contain cadmium off their shelves. Claire's released a statement saying it has no reason to believe that the product is unsafe, but it's removing it out of an abundance of caution. This best friends bracelet sold at Claire's stores contains 89 to 91 percent cadmium, and is no longer for sale. As it is now, it is not illegal to sell jewelry with cadmium in it in the U.S. However, the Consumer Product Safety is looking into the matter after an Associated Press investigation discovered the issue. The AP bought more than one hundred pieces of children's jewelry that was made in China and sold in major retailers in the U.S.. 12 percent of the trinkets contained at least ten percent cadmium. Here's a couple of examples. Some pendants from the Disney movie "The Princess and the Frog had between 25 to 35 percent cadmium. This Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer charm had 91 percent cadmium.

      "American Manufacturers, whether they make their product in Bayonne or Bejing have a responsibility to keep toxic substances out of the hands of our children," says Liz Hitchcock, Consumer Advocate.

      Disney says it requires all of its products to be tested, and says the princess and the frog necklaces were shown to be in compliance with all current safety standards. The CPSC suggests parents not buy metal jewelry for their children.

      So far, the C-P-S-C has issued a stern warning to companies in China who make toys while it investigates.