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      The correct way to conceal and carry in Missouri

      Gun safety is a hot topic these days.

      People from around Northeast Missouri are looking for ways to properly conceal a weapon.

      You can attend training courses, but you need to make sure the course fits regulation. If you aren't careful about what certification class you attend, you may waste your time and money.

      Max Capp runs the Northeast Concealed Weapon Certification Training Academy in Hannibal.

      Capp said his course follows the regulations, but some classes out there do not.

      "Recently, I was told by some sheriffs in the area that there is courses being given locally that are illegal courses. They are not running the full hours, and the sheriffs are finding out and are pulling the certifications issued by those people," Capp said.

      Capp holds this class every week. He says people come in for two reasons.

      Safety, or out of fear they legally won't be allowed to own a gun in the future.

      "A lot of people believe that our government is going to take guns from us and set restrictions we are not going to like," Capp said.

      Capp says there is a specific certificate you receive at the end of each course.

      "If a person doesn't get that certificate, then I would go back to the firearm instructor and say look. You were required to issue the certain firearm certificate. I want that to take to the sheriff," Capp said.

      Regulations to look out for include the following:

      Your class should be eight hours in length. Each class should include shooting 50 rounds or practice shots with both a semi automatic handgun and a revolver. They also must shoot 20 from each gun for qualification. The class must be registered with the sheriff in the county it is located.

      Capp said it is also important to find an instructor who has insurance. He also said it is important to have an instructor with a background involving firearms.

      Marion County Sheriff Jimmy Shinn knows of one class that was technically against regulations due to a law change in August.

      Instructors now must have both a semi-automatic and a revolver at the course. Shinn said once the instructor found out, the class was updated.