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      Texas couple says texting and driving led to daughters death

      The Brown's lost their 17-year-old daughter Alex, in a fatal car crash back in 2009 and they've decided to take the message of not texting and driving to high schools and community groups across the U.S.

      According to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration , there were more then 3,000 fatalities in 2010 that were related to distracted driving.

      And the danger of distracted driving is a campaign that Johnny Mac and Jeannie Brown and their daughter Katrina are talking across the United States.

      By the end of May, the Brown family will have been in 26 states and talked to thousands of people since August of last year. Hoping that the message of making the right choice about texting and driving will hit home with the people who are in the audience.

      "But it comes down to a personal choice. Each individual driver has to decide whether their life is more important then that text message," Johnny Mac Brown said.

      You see, the Brown's lost their 17-year-old daughter Alex, in a fatal car crash back in 2009 and they've decided to take the message of not texting and driving to high schools and community groups across the U.S.

      On this particular day, students at Hannibal High School walked past a wrecked pick up on a trailer and heard the message from the Brown's. Part of that message was that Alex was going 73 miles an hour, texting on her phone and she eventually rolled her truck on a rural Texas highway. The young woman was thrown from the truck and died a few hours later.

      Her mother Jeanne said she and Alex had just talked about text messaging. "Just a few weeks before her wreck I got the phone bill and she had overt 10,000 text messages that month. And we had a talk about it and she got so mad at me because I accused her, I really didn't accuse her, I just said Alex, you've got to be addicted to texting to have this many text messages. She hit the roof. We didn't have a lot of arguments, but we had an argument over that," Brown said.

      The Brown's said if their presentation to student groups and others saves just one person from either killing themselves in a car crash or someone else it's worth all the miles they've driven crossing back and forth across the United States.

      "We want everybody to hear the message we have. But especially parents. Because the wound of burying your teenager cuts so deep we don't want any other family to have to go through this because it's so senseless," Johnny Mac said.

      Both Johnny Mac and Jeannie say they just want to send a simple message to everyone, leave the phone alone

      For more information on Alex Brown and drive to make people more aware about the dangers of distracted driving, you can log onto the website her parents created at www.rememberalexbrownfoundation.org or go to Facebook Remember Alex Brown.