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      Quincy students sign off on 2x4's for Haiti

      Class from St. Dominic's / KHQA's Brooke Hasch

      Update: Saturday, October 9, 2010, 12:00 p.m.

      The Haiti Medical Mission is out on 48th and Broadway in Quincy Saturday. It's asking the community to donate $3 for 2x4's to help build homes in Haiti. To transport materials and build the five houses they plan on constructing in January, the group is just over it's half way mark in funding. It needs a total of $32,200 and needs about $13,000 more.


      For more than ten years, a Quincy group has provided much needed medical help to the Haitian people. But after this year's earthquake ravaged the country, the Haiti Medical Mission's focus shifted.

      Twenty six people from the Quincy area will travel to Haiti to help construct homes for earthquake victims who still need housing, but with much help from the community. Friday, more than a thousand Quincy students made their mark on the future of Haiti.

      Students from Blessed Sacrament, St. Dominic, St. Francis and St. Peter got to decorate the walls of Hatian homes Friday. They signed their names and drew pictures on dozens of 2x4's at a cost of just three dolloars a piece. Each school donated a sum of money to the cause.

      "They need houses because their houses are torn down," said St. Peter Student David Antoniuk.

      It was a lesson learned by nearly 400 kids from St. Peter School in Quincy.

      "In visiting over there, we found that probably 80-90 percent of the people are homeless. Living in tents and broken down shacks," said Mark Lawrence with the Haiti Medical Mission group.

      With a small donation from the community, five families will no longer suffer the quakes aftermath.

      "I know that doesn't sound like a lot, but it's doing our part," said Lawrence."It's just every little bit counts from everybody around the world. At the end of the day, we're going to have 1,000 signatures on these 2x4's from the area kids."

      Names, the Haitian people will come to know for years to come.

      "When you walk into these homes, all these 2x4's will be exposed, all these signatures are going to be there to see forever," said Lawrence.

      A lesson that even the smallest donation can go a long way. In this case, two thousand miles.

      "Three dollars is a small price to pay for the level of happiness its going to bring to this community," said Lawrence.

      The fund raiser continues Friday night at Quincy University. The public is invited to a wine tasting and silent art auction in the Q.U. Hall of Fame Room. Tickets will be sold at the door beginning at 6:30 p.m.

      Saturday, the group will be stationed at 48th and Broadway in Quincy where the public is asked to stop by and purchase 2x4's. It's a chance for everyone to make their mark on Haiti's future.