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      Quincy Public School Board to announce cuts

      UPDATED: March 24 at 11:46 a.m.

      Follow the newest developments in this story by clicking here.

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      UPDATED: March 23 at 12:17 a.m.

      Thirty-one employees with the Quincy Public School District will be out of a job next school year.

      Wednesday night, the Quincy School Board officially voted to cut staff.

      That's because the State of Illinois owes the district $3 million, not to mention the district has a $1 million deficit.

      KHQA's Rajah Maples has the details.

      The Quincy School District's early childhood program took the biggest hit. Click here to see where the cuts will come from.

      QPS Assistant Superintendent Christie Dickens said, "The Head Start program will still continue. The Early Childhood special education program will still continue, but the early childhood program that is funded by the state will not. We're very hopeful that early childhood will receive its funding, and if that were the case, we'd be overjoyed to bring back people who are in that fabulous program."

      Dickens said staff members received informal notices about their future last Friday. Wednesday night's meeting made the cuts official.

      Superintendent Lonny Lemon said, "Nobody who's a board member, teacher or administrator gets into education for moments like this. "

      Many of the cuts will be made based on seniority and Board Member Jeff Mays isn't very happy about that. He thinks teacher performance should factor into the equation.

      Mays said, "This is my fourth year of budget layoffs, and we will be laying off our least senior teachers, and I think it's wrong."

      Oddly enough, Board President Bud Niekamp left in the middle of tonight's meeting. He told the board he had another meeting to attend.

      In other action, the board voted to seek bids for underground work and new turf at Flinn Stadium. That way the board would have a ballpark figure to aim at if they choose to accept those amounts and fund raise for the project. The board also voted to renew Superintendent Lonny Lemon's contract.-------------UPDATED: March 23 at 9:35 p.m.The Quincy School Board broke into executive session a little more than an hour ago to discuss more cuts in teachers and staff.

      Several teachers already know they won't be back in the classroom next year, but Wednesday night, the Quincy School Board is expected to make those cuts official.

      KHQA's Rajah Maples spoke with Superintendent Lonny Lemon about those cuts before the board went into executive session.

      He said, "Nobody who's a board member, teacher or administrator gets into education for moments like this. "

      Many of the cuts will be made based on seniority and Board Member Jeff Mays isn't very happy about that.

      He thinks teacher performance should factor into the equation.

      Mays said, "This is my fourth year of budget layoffs, and we will be laying off our least senior teachers, and I think it's wrong."

      Oddly enough, Board President Bud Niekamp left in the middle of tonight's meeting. He told the board he had another meeting to attend.

      In other action, the board voted to seek bids for underground work and new turf at Flinn Stadium.

      That way the board would have a ballpark figure to aim at if they choose to accept those amounts and fund raise for the project.

      The board also discussed nepotism. Mays said he would like to see a nepotism policy in place similar to the one that John Wood Community College has adopted.

      We'll have much more on what happens at Wednesday night's meeting tomorrow morning on Tri-States this morning and on connect tri-states dot com just as soon as details become available.

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      The Quincy Public Schools Board of Education will meet Wednesday and KHQA's Rajah Maples will be at Baldwin Intermediate School with a preview of the meeting.

      The board will not only consider a resolution supporting legislation regarding teacher performance, but they will consider and approve a reduction plan.

      As stated in the agenda:

      New Business a. Consider/Approve Reduction Plan b. Consider and take action on Resolution Authorizing Non-Renewal of Non-Final year Probationary Teachers c. Consider and take action on Resolution Authorizing Non-Renewal of Non-Final year Probationary Teachers for Economic Reasons d. Consider and take action on Resolution Authorizing Non-Renewal of Final Year Probationary Teachers e. Consider and take action on Resolution Authorizing Non-Renewal of Final Year Probationary Teachers for Economic Reasons f. Consider and take action on Resolution Authorizing Non-Renewal of Part-Time/Part-Year/Hourly Certified Personnel for Economic Reasons g. Consider and take action on Resolution Authorizing Non-Renewal of Part-Time/Part-Year/Hourly Educational Support Personnel for Economic Reasons h. Consider and take action on the Resolution for Honorable Dismissal of Educational Support Personnel for Economic Reasons

      Click here to view the complete agenda.

      Click here to read more from The Quincy Herald-Whig.

      Some teachers were notified last Friday, so in this last step, the public will finally hear who's being eliminated as part of this reduction plan and the final votes will be cast.

      Quincy Public School District Superintendent Lonny Lemon says, "We still have a $1 million deficit in our budget. Plus, the $3 million that the state owes us. We also have some grant-funded jobs that we are concerned about."

      "The cuts won't be as extensive as last year," says Lemon. "The district will try to minimize the impact on students"

      Parents are worried about how these cuts will directly affect their children.

      "It makes me sad, especially for the teachers that they may not have jobs next year, and hopefully the class sizes wouldn't get any bigger. It's hard for the teachers, who are especially spread thin now as it it and I'd hate to see them have to be spread even thinner," said Tanya Fischer. "I think when there's so many children in the class, it's hard for that teacher to give them individual attention that they might require."

      "If it's performance based, it's one think. If it's fiscal, I just feel like everything needs to be done to keep it from happening. I work for the city. We did furlough days to help with the budget crunch for the city. If it means furlough day or anything else to keep them from losing their jobs, especially the good ones," said Mark Schwindeler.

      Many of the other parents echoed that sentiment.

      We want to hear from you. Tell us your concerns below or visit our Facebook page to let your voice be heard!

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