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      Quincy City Council talks dump truck and traffic lights

      UPDATED 9:06 p.m. Jan. 9, 2012 The City of Quincy will not donate a dump truck to a local Boy Scouts of America troop.

      A resolution to do just that failed by a 6 to 8 vote at Monday night's Quincy City Council meeting.

      In November, a council member had requested to donate an old run down dump truck sitting in a gravel lot at Central Services to the Boy Scouts.

      Councilman Kyle Moore told KHQA that the Boy Scouts is a great organization but that the city needs to follow a formal process to get money back for the tax payers.

      Councilman Steve Duesterhaus addressed last week's concerns that there needs to be some method to dispose of the city's unwanted property.

      Duesterhaus said, "We already have that method, and it's called the auction. In that manner, we don't pick and choose who we are going to favor. Surplus equipment goes to auction. If someone has a desire for it, they are free. It is available to be bid on and that has been a good system, and I prefer we stick with that."

      In other action, council members voted to replace some of the city's older stop lights along Maine Street and at 12th and State.

      The council originally denied the project saying the estimates were too high, but new bids have come along that meets the city engineer's budget.

      Councilman Moore says the city received grant money from the Illinois Department of Transportation for the new lights.

      **********************************************At a time when many city governments are experiencing financial challenges, would you try to grab as much funding as possible or give some of that money to others in need?

      That's the question the Quincy City Council will answer Monday night during its weekly meeting. It's centered around an old run down dump truck sitting in a gravel lot at Central Services.

      In November, a council member had requested or earmarked the dump truck for the local Boy Scouts of America.

      "The council wasn't made aware of it and I don't believe many people knew about it. And it was just kind of assumed that the council would go ahead and approve it," said Councilman Kyle Moore.

      Moore says that wasn't the case back in November, and it's unsure of how the council will vote Monday.

      "Everybody loves the Boy Scouts.They do a great job and I don't think the issue is if the Boy Scouts do a good job for the community. The issue is that we have a process. Normally, after a truck or piece of equipment is no longer needed by the city, we send it to auction.That allows us to get money back for the tax payers. A lot of time, we'll use that money to help pay for the new equipment.It also gives everybody a fair shot at getting the piece of equipment that we're no longer using," said Moore.

      So do you sell the truck to get money for it's replacement or donate it to a local non-profit?

      "I believe most people are worried about getting any money back to the tax payers. And two, the process that we had was not fair. Most people didn't even know they could be in line for a dump truck," said Moore.

      Moore says the council needs to agree upon a written process for non-profits looking at the city's unwanted items. He suggests allowing a 30-day window to let interested parties have the chance to bid on the item, instead of sending it directly to an auction.

      "I think that would be fair, but we can't be picking winners and losers based on who you know in the city," said Moore.

      Moore says the argument isn't about the Boy Scouts.

      "You could insert any name in there and I believe we'd be having the same discussion," said Moore.

      The dump truck, which needs a couple grand in repairs, would be used for maintenance and to help the Scouts clear some of their facilities.

      Another issue on Monday's agenda is the possibility of replacing some of the city's older stop lights along Maine Street including signals at 30th and 36th Street.

      The council originally denied the project saying the estimates were too high, but new bids have come along that meets the city engineer's budget.

      Councilman Moore says the city received grant money from the Illinois Department of Transportation for the new lights.