69
      Sunday
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      Monday
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      Tuesday
      91 / 70

      QJHS students prove it's easy to be green

      It doesn't take much to make a difference. That's the message that Cheryl Koenig and her students are sending as part of the Quincy Junior High Environmental Club.

      It doesn't take much to make a difference. That's the message that Cheryl Koenig and her students are sending as part of the Quincy Junior High Environmental Club.

      "We need to take care of the Earth," Koenig said. "We only have one Earth here and if we don't take care of it, it won't be there for future generations."

      Koenig is the sponsor of the group that started about 4 years ago. The main focus of the club is to make the school a little more green in several ways.

      "I wanted to help the community and try to recycle things. Environmental Club is my favorite thing," Jacob Tenney, a ninth-grade QJHS student and member of the Environmental Club said.

      The club plans several projects throughout the year, like planting in front of the school. They also aim to re-use, like they do with this closet full of school supplies. What students might normally throw away at the end of the year, the club saves for the next year for more students to use. Their next big idea is to work with the student council on starting a school-wide plastic bottle recycling program.

      "Just you saving a couple of bottles could make a really big difference," club member Alex Roed said.

      "It will take a commitment on the part of the students," Koenig said. "They'll have to contact school board members and the administration, the maintenance department to get their approval to help with this project, but they'll also have to take an initiative to promote it just with their peers."

      These kids are taking action. But maybe more importantly, they're learning an important lesson: you're never too young to do your part.

      "I guess in my own little way I'm making a big difference. I'm making a difference by helping the school out and the community," Roed said.

      "Hopefully they'll take that on with them to their adult life and into the real world," Koenig added.