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      Playground dangers that go unseen during the summer

      Slide temperatures can reach upwards of 140 degrees if in contact with direct sunlight.

      With temperatures finally feeling like summer in the Tri-States, it's local pools and parks that are starting to see rising attendances.

      But when kids are playing in the sun, a sun burn isn??t the only issue parents need to worry about.

      "If something has been in the sun all day, like it has this week, there's a good chance its going to be quite hot,?? Quincy Park District??s Tim Klobe said.

      One attraction that sits in the sun all day is a kid favorite, found at almost every park nationwide. The slide.

      "On these hot playground equipment, which can get up to 130, 140 degrees, it does place the children at risk,?? Dr. Seth Heimer said. Heimer works with the SIU Quincy Family Medicine Program.

      Sure enough, he was right.

      We tested the temperature of a slide at one of Quincy's parks with a heat thermometer.

      At 10 a.m., the slide was at 118 degrees.

      At 3 p.m., the temperature had risen to almost 150 degrees.

      Heimer says those numbers can easily do damage to a child's skin.

      "It definitely places the children at risk for thermal burns, specifically first and second degree," Heimer said.

      Klobe says there's a simple fix when it comes to avoiding injuries due to hot playground equipment. And it starts with the parents.

      "If they're going to let their kids play on they playground, then they need to put their hand on, feel it, figure out the temperature before they let their kid play on it," Klobe said.

      And if a parent really wants to avoid what could be a potential burn, Heimer said it??s all about skin coverage.

      "Appropriate clothing would be best, make sure their skin is not coming into contact with the plastic, or maybe making sure they stay off the playground would be an appropriate step,?? Heimer said.

      Tim Klobe says hot slides are common at all parks around the country and he wanted to stress to parents that the only way to prevent a slide or equipment burn, is by just being aware.