Making Kindness Kount

      Every day, 160,000 students across the country skip school because they're being bullied, according to the National Education Association.

      But one fifth grader is taking a stand.

      Walk down the hall at Camp Point Central Junior High and it looks like any other school. But when you walk into Mrs. Altenhein's classroom... You see something different... A paper chain. And each individual link... has an important message on it.

      "They're writing about either if they've done something nice for a parent or teacher, they say something nice to someone, they helped someone pick up their papers, stuff like that," says Kaylyn Orpet-Hulett.

      And each good deed...

      "When you do a good deed, you put a chain up there," said student Max Hennen.

      It's part of a program called Kindness Kounts: Start your chain reaction today...

      "It's mostly about to stop bullying and to really put down when you help people," said student Calleah Dunn.

      Eleven-year-old Kaylyn Orpet-Hulett came up with the idea after she had been picked on.

      "I've been bullied and I know some of the other kids in this school and other schools have been bullied too, and it doesn't feel good," said Kaylyn.

      Right now, the program is only in Mrs. Altenhein's class, but there are plans for it to grow to other fifth grade classrooms.

      "Her goal is 100 chains," said Mrs. Altenhein.

      "How many do you have so far? At least 50," said Kaylyn.

      "If we can reach 100, then we're going to talk to the other 2 teachers," said Altenhein.

      "I think it's a good visual reminder everyday that they need to be practicing good deeds, and so they can just look up there everyday and be reminded, 'Oh, look, we have some new chains added today, I need to go do something good,' and it's just really been effecting them and they love to put the chains up there," said Altenhein.

      "If you do a good deed for others, it makes them feel good, it makes you feel good," said Hennen.

      After the entire fifth grade gets involved, Kaylyn hope the program spreads to the elementary and middle schools as well.