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      Madigan plan could cut 3.1 million dollars from Quincy budget

      Illinois House Speaker Mike Madigan has proposed three amendments diverting money from other sources to pay for teacher pensions.

      Updated: May 17 at 8 a.m.

      Quincy Mayor John Spring and other officials turned out to fight funding cuts at the State capitol Wednesday.

      Spring and others turned in testimony to state lawmakers regarding massive cuts to revenues generated by the personal property replacement tax that corporations pay.

      The state is proposing to highjack the funds from local governments to pay for teacher pensions. If passed, Quincy could lose three million dollars or ten percent of its budget.

      According to the Quincy Journal , if funding is lost, two fire stations would close and the city would lose 18 firefighters and seven police officers. Click here to read more from the Quincy Journal.

      Adams County taxing bodies could lose $10 million dollars.

      If approved, the action would take effect July 1.

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      Original Story: May 14

      3.1 Million dollars in revenue for the city of Quincy could be in jeopardy.

      That amounts to 10 percent of next year's budget.

      Illinois House Speaker Mike Madigan has proposed three amendments diverting money from other sources to pay for teacher pensions.

      One of those suggestions would take the personal property replacement tax that corporations pay to municipalities, counties, villages and school districts and use it to pay off those pensions.

      Quincy Mayor John Spring says the plan would devastate communities across the state including Quincy. He says it would affect services and more than likely lead to staff layoffs.

      What frustrates Mayor Spring is that city leaders like himself were guaranteed that these funds were not going to be touched.

      "Right now we're 4 months behind in receiving those funds that are guaranteed us that are earned right here in our community. So right now to turn around and say we might wipe out one of those components of that local government distributive fund doesn't make me feel to good," Mayor Spring said.

      A decision on this could come soon, since the state legislature is scheduled to end its session by the end of the month.

      Mayor Spring says he has been in contact with Rep. Tracey and Senator Sullivan and expects to travel to Springfield himself to try and stop these amendments from passing.