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      Macomb applies for Safe Routes to School grant

      The city of Macomb is in the process of applying for a federal Safe Routes to School grant.

      Macomb could receive up to $160,000 to put sidewalks and handicap accessible ramps in place.

      Along Grant Street to MacArthur School and onto Macomb Junior-Senior High School, is where the ramp and even sidewalks will hopefully be, come next school year.

      If the city receives this grant, it would prevent children from having to walk on the main road and carry their bikes up the steep set of stairs.

      "The whole purpose of the Safe Routes to School grant is to provide safe paths for kids to get from where they live to school, uh, more safely and to encourage kids to walk and ride bicycles to school," Macomb Superintendent Patrick Twomey.

      While the initial purpose of this grant is for safety, it would also encourage kids to stay physically fit.

      "There's an element here of physical exercise that it's a need, ya know, the more, more kids that can either ride their bike, walk to school, skateboard to school, whatever, the better," City of Macomb Administrator Dean Torreson said.

      The grant needs to be submitted by the 31st of January, and from there, it takes about 3-6 months to get approved.

      One of the major requirements in applying for this grant is for the school district to provide a survey to the students. It would include questions regarding their usage and need of these sidewalks and ramp.

      "But we need the school district support in the terms of just general support and also in terms of conducting that survey, and um, I believe that the regional council will help probably put that survey instrument together and they also help in just executing it," Torreson said.

      The grant does not say what percentage of the survey needs to be in favor, but they do know, the higher the percentage, the better chance of approval.

      If the grant is approved, it will only take about a year for the construction to be completed.

      Story by KHQA Multimedia Journalist Lauren Kalil.