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      Local school district is trying to stay afloat

      NAUVOO, ILL.-- Voters in the Nauvoo-Colusa school district said "no" to a tax increase in the April 9th election.

      The School District met adequate yearly progress for no child left behind this year.

      But now, the lack of funding for the school is leaving no other choice but to sell working cash bonds in support of the school or face the state of Illinois intervening.

      "It's important the students are educated," Superintendent of the Nauvoo School District, Kent Young said. "We have made as many cuts as possible in my personal opinion and with the school board and working cash bonds they can cut the entire curriculum," he said.

      Superintendent Kent Young says the school has gone through cut after cut, year after year to stay open leaving the school with fewer options to save money.

      "Over the years we have cut cut cut," said Young. "We don't have a school councilor. We just don't have a lot of things most schools do. We are already bare bones," he said.

      "I'm a little concerned we wont be able to provide education to our students like we should be able to," said junior high teacher, LeeAnn Lambert.

      Young believes the children of Nauvoo-Colusa are receiving a quality education. Unfortunately he says the lack of funding will eventually begin to impact teachers.

      "The teachers are excellent in the schools in my personal opinion, some of the best around," said Young. "All the teachers will be intact next year but after that who knows. Its up to the school board to make those decisions, he said."

      Even with working cash bonds the school board can still cut programs.

      "We provide an excellent education but if we don't have the money then we aren't going to be able to provide an education at all," said Young.

      "We can't cut much more so its probably going to start in a lot of the places where the gets get enjoyment like sports and music," said Lambert.

      Young says even with all the cuts, the students continue to receive a top notch education. He said that is the main reason he is staying optimistic.

      "I just want the children to get a good education because they will be our future down the road," said Lambert.

      "I am very optimistic. It is an excellent school district. Its great. Its just unfortunate because the referendum could have really helped us," Young said.