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      KHQA staff recounts storm damage

      KHQA staff members are hitting the streets to survey storm damage. These are their reports:Rajah Maples KHQA Anchor/reporter:I left the KHQA Studio at around 8:45 a.m. Monday morning en route to Monroe City and Shelbina. It was chilly and very gray. As I was driving on Highway 36, I saw a lot of downed trees and tree limbs.

      I drove through Monroe City and saw some structural damage. The canopy of the Casey TMs General Store was damaged, with parts of it lying across the street. One building (I was told it was an ice cream shop?) had significant damage. It looked like the roof was destroyed. As I was heading to the Monroe City Airport, I saw more trees and limbs down. I passed the Monroe City Baptist Church, untouched, pointed at it and told the sales associate in my vehicle that that church was destroyed by Mother Nature about five years ago. Thankfully, the new church appeared untouched.

      I arrived at the Monroe City Airport, and found a 1962 Cessna airplane pushed out of a hangar, which had fallen in on the plane. The owner of that plane arrived shortly after I did. He was a nice, friendly man from Paris, Mo. who didn TMt seem angry or sad that his plane was damaged. He told me how the aircraft was an anniversary edition, and joked that planes were supposed to withstand high winds.

      I then went to a gas station in Monroe City as the sun started shining. I TMm not sure about everyone else, but my mood lifted when I saw sunshine. The gas station had power, but the woman standing in line in front of me appeared ragged. She said she was without power and was told she would be without power for at least another day. I asked the clerk why that particular gas station had power. She told me that SOME areas in Monroe City had power.

      On my way to Shelbina, I saw more downed trees and tree limbs. I was told the south part of Shelbina had the worst damage, so I headed south and saw trees all over the place down residential streets. People were out in yards cleaning up limbs and debris. I pulled over to talk with two ladies who were working in a yard. They looked tired, but were very nice and kind to stop what they were doing to give me directions to the trailer park, which I had heard was nearly destroyed.

      What I had heard was true. The trailer park was a sight to see. Insulation was all over fences and trees. Some trailers were untouched, but others were absolutely destroyed. One trailer in particular was absolutely leveled, and all of its items were spilling out into the yard. That sight was pretty sad. However, I didn TMt see any residents nearby.Jim Robesky. Content Manager KHQA:I did a run on the Highway 24 coridor in Adams County. I began in Fowler. Trees were down all over town. Fire crews were helping people clean up trees and pumping water out of basements. One property looked like the tree's were struck by lightning. Those tree's fell on the home. There was damage to the property. Many power lines were down in Fowler.Coatsburg had trees down all over. But I made my way South on the Columbus Blacktop. A couple miles out of town a home had 10 tree's knocked over from the roots. 5 or more trees on the property were topped. There was no damage to the home.In Columbus, trees were down at just about every residence. Many roads were blocked by trees. Several homes were damaged. One resident told me the storm sounded like 80 jet planes flying over. She said she had no basement, so she grabbed her dogs and went.I did a run on the Highway 24 coridor in Adams County. I began in Fowler. Trees were down all over town. Fire crews were helping people clean up trees and pumping water out of basements. One property looked like the tree's were struck by lightning. Those tree's fell on the home. There was damage to the property. Many power lines were down in Fowler.

      Coatsburg had trees down all over. But I made my way South on the Columbus Blacktop. A couple miles out of town a home had 10 tree's knocked over from the roots. 5 or more trees on the property were topped. There was no damage to the home.

      In Columbus, trees were down at just about every residence. Many roads were blocked by trees. Several homes were damaged. One resident told me the storm sounded like 80 jet planes flying over. She said she had no basement, so she grabbed her dogs and went to an interior room.

      Camp Point was hit hard by the strong winds. Several roads were blocked and wires were down all over town. I saw one building near the train tracks that had no roof. The wind had blown it completely off. Several homes had tree's on top of them. Several cars were damaged by downed trees. Chain saws and axes were in full swing cleaning up. One resident had a crane in the street to help lift the giant tree off the roof.

      Gas stations in many of the small towns are without power. Generators were being brought in to get them up and running. But, the gas will be used for emergency vehicles only.Chad Douglas, KHQA Anchor/reporter:I'm just leaving Canton, Missouri. Power is beginning to come back on in Canton. Heading to Lewistown... Lewis County Missouri is cleaning up from a wicked night of storms. So far, LaGrange, Missouri has been the worst. I saw a tree on top of car at 5th and Jackson in LaGrange. Lots of power lines done. In Canton, there were a few large trees down, one on a house, the other ripped a sidewalk out of the ground at Martin Park. Electricity is starting to come back on now in Canton.Brandy Blickhan, KHQA Account ExecutiveI drove through Quincy from 36th and State Street today to survey the storm damage. Many roads were closed and hundreds of trees down. I was unable to get ahold of my parents in Spring Lake so I headed out that way. 12th Street from Koetters lane to highway 24 was closed due to power lines down. Upon driving through Spring Lake a trampoline was wrapped around the first stop sign. Mature trees were down throughout the subdivision in Spring Lake Estates. As I drove down the street to the back of the subdivision the amount of damage increased the closer I got to the bluffs. I was unable to get all the way back to my parents house due to 100 year old plus tree down. (See photo). I finally walked/ran to their house to help survey the damage. They lost screens on the porch and had many limbs down. The neighbors lost part of their roof and others had severe damage with limbs in roof and in house. I was able to get to out of the neighborhood unlike their neighbors. Because of this, I headed to the Casey's General Store on 24th and Wismann Area to get coffee for the neighbors who were trying to cut themselves out. The employees at Casey's were phenomenal. Their was a line 20 deep of people wanting coffee or drinks. They did their best to keep up with the demand. I left with 9 cups of coffee and a soda for the great group of people working together. I arrived back to deliver the coffee. In my parents 31 years of living in that house, I have never seen the neighbors band together like they did to cut a path to get cars through. They were banding together for a common goal. My 75 year old father was cutting limbs with the chainsaw. I also visited a family that had extreme damage and delivered them coffee. The tears were heartwrenching. We took a ride throughout the neighborhood and the Country Club to see their damage. You couldn't get through on Eagle Pine Drive. Homan Falls Drive had extreme damage. My uncle had a tree on his house and limb through the roof and ceiling of his kitchen. His front bay window was pushed in and had not broken yet. You would see neighbors all banding together to help one another...a great testiment to the phenomenal people on the Tri-State area. The golf course lost probably 15-20% of the trees. Mature trees were uprooted and leaves and limbs were scattered throughout. Once I had all of my family accounted for, I headed to KHQA where 36th and Wismann was closed.

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