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      Horses mistreated and left for dead in Roodhouse

      Photos of horse abuse at Roodhouse horse farm. / Scott and LaNise Kirk via Crime Crawlers website

      UPDATED: July 18 at 7:55 p.m. A judge has denied a plea agreement for a Greene County woman accused of mistreating several horses in Roodhouse, Illinois.

      The Greene County Circuit Clerk's office couldn't elaborate on that plea agreement.

      A judge continued the pretrial hearing for Stacey Kempf until September 19.

      Kempf of Jerseyville is charged with 30 misdemeanor counts of animal misconduct.

      She faces nine counts of violating the Illinois Dead Animal Disposal Act, nine counts of cruel treatment of an animal and 12 counts of violating owner duties, meaning she failed to provide food, water and proper vet care.

      A jury trial is scheduled for October 1.

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      UPDATED: April 7 at 9:03 p.m. You voted for it, our Facebook story of the Day for April 7th -- an update on a story of abused horses in Roodhouse, Illinois.

      The last four of those neglected animals were moved from a property in Green County to a horse rescue facility in Barrington, Illinois located near Chicago.

      KHQA spoke with the head of the Central Illinois Horse Rescue.

      The organization originally had 26 horses left from that horse abuse case.

      Steve Alexander was able to place those animals in homes throughout the state.

      Central Illinois Horse Rescue was certified by the state as an equine rescue facility in 2010.

      Donations are needed to help with rescues like the one was saw in Roodhouse, so visit their website if you feel passionate about this issue.

      ------------UPDATED: April 5 at 1:15 p.m.

      Stecey Kempf pleaded not guilty to 30 misdemeanor counts involving animals on her property. The court hearing took place in Green County, Ill.

      Kempf pretrial hearing is scheduled for July 6, at 10 a.m. Her jury trial is scheduled for July 18, at 9 a.m.

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      UPDATED: March 25 at 7:45 a.m.

      The woman accused of mistreating 9 horses in Greene County has agreed to turn over 26 additional horses to authorities.

      41-year-old Stacey Kempf of Jerseyville is charged with 30 misdemeanor counts of animal misconduct.

      She is accused of failing to properly get rid of the horses after they died.

      Kempf has agreed to turn over the horses to the Central Illinois Horse Rescue which will try to find homes for them.

      The alleged abuse took place between December of last year and last month and Stacey Kempf is free on bond right now.

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      UPDATED: March 17 at 9:37 p.m.

      QUEST Stables says horse abuse happens more than you might think. Click on video of what QUEST President Carole Hackett has to say about it.

      If you suspect horse abuse, Hackett encourages everyone to call authorities immediately.

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      UPDATED: March 17 at 3:56 p.m.

      According to a news release Stacey L. Kempf, age 42, of Jerseyville, Illinois, was charged in Greene County Case # 11-CM-32 with nine counts of Violation of Dead Animal Disposal Act, nine counts of Cruel Treatment, and twelve counts of Owner TMs Duties, for her involvement in the death and poor health of several horses she owns on a Greene County farm. The charges are the result of a two week investigation initiated by the Illinois Department of Agriculture with the assistance of the Greene County Sheriff TMs Department. A warrant for the arrest of Stacey L. Kempf was issued in the amount of $15,000.00 in case # 11-CM-32. Possible penalties include up to a year in jail, probation, and/or fines.

      While the surviving horses currently remain on the Greene County property owned by Stacey L. Kempf, the Central Illinois Horse Rescue of rural Roodhouse is currently exercising daily supervision of those horses with the consent of the property owner and at the request of the Greene County Sheriff and the Greene County State TMs Attorney. The surviving horses are receiving food, water, and veterinary care, largely provided by the rescue. The surviving horses are subject to being forfeited, removed from the owner, placed in foster care, and ultimately adopted. That effort is being coordinated through the Central Illinois Horse Rescue with the assistance of the Illinois Department of Agriculture, the sheriff, and the state TMs attorney.

      Citizens interested in assisting are encouraged to visit http://www.cilhorserescue.com. The Central Illinois Horse Rescue does accept donations of all types and can be contacted for interest in foster placements. I strongly discourage individuals interested in assisting from attempting to feed the horses directly or otherwise trespassing on private property. While we understand and appreciate the desire to help, feeding the surviving horses could disrupt the rescue TMs recovery plan and trespassing on private property could result in criminal charges. The surviving horses are receiving the best possible care available through the state certified, local horse rescue.

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      UPDATED: March 17 at 7:05 a.m.

      KHQA's Rajah Maples has reached out to the workers of Quest, who are helping with the rescue of the surviving horses.

      We will try to bring you more information Thursday on this ongoing situation.

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      UPDATED: March 15 at 8:22 a.m.

      41-year-old Stacy Kempf turned herself in to police yesterday after a warrant was issued. Click here to read more from WEAI FM 107.1.

      WEAI says that the warrant was issued for nine counts of violating the Illinois Dead Animal Disposal Act, nine counts of cruel treatment of an animal and 12 counts of violating owner duties, meaning she failed to provide food, water and proper vet care.

      Kempf was released after posting bond. MyJournalCourier.com reports that a court appearance is set for April 4.

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      When one couple heard a piece of property was for sale in Roodhouse, Illinois, they decided to go take a look. They stumbled upon a horror scene.

      Scott and LaNise Kirk came forward with their discovery of nine dead horses and more horses living in deplorable conditions.

      Click here to get more information from the website that was anonymously emailed to KHQA. WARNING: The website contains foul language and graphic images of badly abused and dead horses.

      The Central Illinois Horse Rescue Society was contacted and they, in turn, contacted the Illinois Department of Agriculture.

      MyJournalCourier.com reports that the alleged owner of the property does not live on the property. They say that one of the horse farm's neighbors, Art Churchill, said the horse owner had contacted him Feb. 28, asking that he bring her two large round bales of hay."She told me she needed the hay on site as an investigator was coming," Churchill said. "And at 7 a.m. Tuesday, she called me to come operate a small excavator she rented so I could bury some horses for her."

      Churchill was shocked at what he saw. Read more about his reaction at MyJournalCourier.com.

      In total, there were thirteen deaths and 20 emaciated horses. Officials are still investigating this case and the alleged owner has given up possession of the remaining horses.

      KHQA will continue to follow this story out of Greene County, so check this story at a later time.

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