71
      Friday
      92 / 72
      Saturday
      91 / 74
      Sunday
      93 / 72

      Drought-stricken community prays for rain

      Many people at Sunday's service said this drought has affected not only farmers and ranchers, but the overall economy.

      Mother Nature has proven herself a powerful force this year, but dozens of Quincy churches believe the power of prayer can put an end to this disastrous drought.

      Sunday evening, dozens of Quincy area churches merged at Madison Park for a city-wide prayer service. A number of pastors took to the stage for prayer as musicians from the Crossing performed the worship.

      "What makes this different is that there's people from all churches here. It's not just one church individually praying but all the Christian churches in the area are meeting to pray," Neal Woollard with the Crossing in Quincy said.

      "We thought it would be much more effective and that God would be very pleased that we came together as a community and put our hearts and thoughts and our minds together and pray that the Lord would open up the heavens for us and give us that blessing," Father Patrick Smith with St. John's Anglican Parish in Quincy said.

      Many people at Sunday's service said this drought has affected not only farmers and ranchers, but the overall economy.

      Last week, the USDA rated more than 66 percent of Illinois' corn crop poor to very poor. That was just one of the many devastating statistics announced during a drought presentation at the service.