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      Don't overlook the back-to-school eye exam

      Dr. Tracy performs a routine eye exam.

      It's back to school time, and that means buying all the necessary school supplies your child may need. But one thing you don't want to forget to do before school starts, is get your child's eye's examined.

      Dr. Paul Tracy is an optometrist and says the eye exam is an essential part of your child's health and education.

      "The number one thing that we think about with them is buying their school supplies right now. Everybody's going out, loading up on school supplies, it's a lot of fun, it's great. But the one tool we're not thinking about sometimes is the fact that 80 percent of what they're going to learn will be visually based. And if they don't have proper vision, they're already missing one of the most important tools for the classroom," Tracy said.

      Even if you believe your child's vision seems okay, you're still recommended to have their vision tested, even as early as six-months-old.

      There are signs you can look for to determine if your child is having difficulty seeing, but the best indicator is to have them examined by an optometrist.

      "We have this long laundry list of things to look for in kids, sitting too close to the TV, putting their books too close to them, but the funny thing I think, especially being a dad what I figured out is that a lot of things we say to look for are the things kids do naturally. And so really, the only honest way to figure out if your kid has a vision problem is to get their eyes checked," Tracy said.

      August is National Eye Exam Month, so while you're child gets checked up on for school, you might want to stop in for yourself as well.

      "Very few people wake up in the morning and go "Wow, I suddenly can't see as well as I do." It's a very slow process, and it's very gradual, and happens over time. And so, especially for adults, getting their eyes checked maybe once every year, or at least every two years, you're going to catch any subtle changes in your vision over time," Tracy said.

      Dr. Tracy also said that the longer someone avoids an eye exam, the harsher affects it can have on your eyesight.