75
      Sunday
      94 / 74
      Monday
      88 / 73
      Tuesday
      84 / 68

      Dividing lines over Quincy's proposed 48th Street project

      Quincy residents voiced concerns Wednesday night over a proposed 48th Street project

      An informational meeting Wednesday night in Quincy turned into quite a debate about the future of 48th Street.

      The Adams County Highway Department wants to reduce the road from four lanes to three. It also wants to add a roundabout at 48th and State.

      The project would also add bike lanes on both sides of the road.

      "There are studies that indicate, a 3-lane roadway would carry up to 16 to 20 thousand cars a day, we're currently operating at about 7 to 8 thousand cars a day on that roadway," County Engineer Jim Frankenhoff said. "Obviously we have capacity for 2 to 3 times as much traffic that its handling right now."

      Frankenhoff said the estimated $100,00 cost of the lane reduction, or 'road diet', would be split between the city and Adams County.

      "The roundabout cost right now based on everything inclusive, is roughly $1.5 million dollars," he added.

      Frankenhoff also mentioned that a roundabout would be more cost-effective in the long run because the city won't have to keep up repair efforts for the traffic lights and their signals.

      Quincy residents at Wednesday's meeting spoke up about the proposed changes.

      Marsha Phillips, who lives on 48th Street, said she had 'mixed feelings'.

      That seemed to be the case for the hundreds that showed up to the Quincy Holiday Inn.

      Christi May said she thinks it's going to negatively impact the businesses in the area, and not encourage new development.

      While opinions on the project itself differed, several residents were frustrated with how the meeting was handled.

      Many residents said they should have had more time to prepare for this decision, rather than being limited to one month.

      "I want them to let us look at the latest numbers, and research they've done and we can bring our own research in, too." Marshall said.