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      City to host forum on devastating tree bug

      UPDATED: December 11 at 8:37 p.m.

      It's not here yet, but that could soon change.

      That's the message Quincy's mayor has about an infestation of the Emerald Ash Borer.

      Very few people turned out for a second informational meeting Tuesday night about the devastating insect that could affect the region's tree population.

      The Emerald Ash Borer has taken over thousands of ash trees in the upper Midwest, including the whole state of Michigan.

      The Chicago and Bloomington/Normal areas are losing many trees to this tiny insect, which has been spotted as close as Galesburg, Illinois.

      "I really wish more people would come to these meetings, not just from the standpoint of the city trees but those trees that are on people's private properties," Mayor John Spring said. "It's a serious problem, and we're going to have to be proactive in coming up with our attack as to how we will handle this."

      Mayor Spring says Quincy has more than 12,000 trees on the city right of ways -- 1200 of those, or 10 percent, are ash trees.

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      ORIGINAL STORY

      The City of Quincy will hold its second informational meeting about a potentially devastating insect that could affect the region's tree population.

      The Emerald Ash Bore has taken over thousands of ash trees in the upper Midwest.

      Interest in the subject spurred a second meeting at 6 p.m. Tuesday in the city council chambers.

      Scott Schirmer of the Illinois Department of Agriculture will make a presentation about the department's perspective about the Emerald Ash Bore and what effect it has on ash trees.

      The Chicago and Bloomington/Normal areas are losing many trees to this tiny insect, and it was found in Kansas City just this past year.

      The number one way of spreading the invasive species is by transporting firewood.

      An arborist Jeff Palmer gave a presentation last month to city officials.