86
      Sunday
      94 / 74
      Monday
      88 / 73
      Tuesday
      84 / 68

      Brown & Hancock counties record no fatal accidents

      Nine hundred and sixty-three people lost their lives in traffic crashes during 2012 in the State of Illinois. That averages about two and a half people everyday.

      But there are six counties across the state that didn't record a traffic fatality in 2012 and two of those counties are in West Central Illinois.

      So when the Illinois State Police or other police agencies in Brown County go out on patrol, they're looking for drivers who might be violating the law. Especially with what the state police call the fatal four.

      That's distracted driving, speeding, non use of a seat belt or being under the influence of alcohol. Those four things can contribute to being in a fatal car crash.

      In Brown County and Hancock County there were no fatal accidents in those respective counties and now both counties are being recognized for their accomplishment.

      "I think it's a collaborative effort. I mean we have strong enforcement, we enforce the Illinois Vehicle Code, the fatal four violations. But also that couple with education, our safety education officer, the schools, the states attorney's office, the illinois department of transportation and highway department for maintaining the roads. It's a collaborative effort," Illinois State Police Lt. Glen Schwartz said.

      Statistics show that many young people are involved in accidents. But in Illinois, the state has taken measures to provide more education to young people who are about to get their license. Eric Grady is a drivers education teacher at Brown County High School and he said the laws today are more advanced then they were 15- or 20-years-ago.

      "It's just a more concerted effort from a lot of people. It might start with the school, but there are parents, peers, a lot of people are involved in the driving process now, that weren't 10- or 20-years-ago," Grady said.

      So far this year, 48 people have died on Illinois roads, that's one more then the same time last year. But the hope of the state police is commit to Driving Zero Fatalities to a Reality.