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      Bricks begin to fall from the Newcomb Hotel

      Watching demolition of the Newcomb Hotel

      Friday night, the Newcomb Hotel caught fire, and is now a total loss.

      Saturday, the city was trying to figure out the next step.

      Then on Sunday, the next step was taken.

      The Quincy Downtown Square doesn't usually see many visitors around six in the morning. Only this time, the visitors wanted to see the show.

      The demolition of the Newcomb Hotel had a big group of spectators.

      Watch a short Vine video of the demolition here. Here's one more.

      Some people were even hoping to take home a piece of the building with them to remember it.

      "This building has been here ever since I can remember. Delivering papers in there, you know, it's just almost like part of our family," Lisa Morrell said.

      The show ended up having a couple hour delay, while the contractors worked through a couple obstacles, such as street lights in the way.

      "I think it's cool. It's going to take a long time. If they take a bigger swing more of it would fall," Robin Little said.

      Chuck Bevelheimer is the Planning Director for the city of Quincy.

      He said it is important to get this building knocked down as soon as possible.

      "We have a five story building. We have walls that are not supported laterally with floors and roof. Our worry is that the walls could push onto the streets or adjacent properties," Bevelheimer explained.

      The question then becomes, how can you investigate the cause of the fire, when you are turning the site into a pile of rubble?

      "It takes quite a bit. When you have this much damage, we look at several things. The investigators are kind of keeping an eye on things as it's coming down to see if we can see any patterns," Quincy Fire Captain Mark Bigelow said.

      Some residents said it's sad to see the building go, because it has been a part of Quincy for so long.

      "It's been there since I was a kid. You walk by and it's just, um. You will miss it," Quincy resident Jeff Martin said.

      Bevelheimer said they demolished about 60 percent of what they were hoping for on Sunday.

      They ran into some issues they didn't account for that delayed the process.

      He said they will be back at work Monday morning at 6:30.

      Travis Brown with the Historic Quincy Business District said all of the businesses are ready to resume regular hours come Monday.