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      Beef prices expected to rise

      David Dedert, a local grain and livestock farmer, says the recent Texas drought and rising grain costs are key factors to the price hikes.

      Grilling season may not be as long this year and that is because of rising meat prices.

      David Dedert, a local grain and livestock farmer, says the recent Texas drought and rising grain costs are key factors to the price hikes.

      A local business owner says the prices are going to be around for awhile.

      "And right now we're paying prices that I've never seen before in my life, I've been in this business my whole life and we're paying for ribeyes right now a dollar fifty to two dollars more than we paid last year, Dan Viehl, owner of the Butcher Block, said.

      Beef is not the only one with price hikes.

      The porcine epidemic diarrehea (PED) virus was detected in in the United States in 2013. It has driven pork prices up dramatically.

      "Figure I just heard was looking at since May of last year there have been approximately six point eight million baby pigs have died so that's affecting the amount of pigs coming on market which will in turn drive the prices up on the consumer end, Dedert said.

      Both Vahl and Dedert say both industries, beef and pork, will have to raise their prices because the demand is higher than the supply at this time.

      But where does that leave chicken?

      They say you should expect rising chicken prices too because they will want to capitalize on their counterparts driven up prices.

      In the meantime, we should expect to see elevated prices for the next couple of years until farmers can rebuild their stock.

      "You are going to see the market on ground beef, you are going to see the market on a steak at your restaurants that you go to, all of that stuff is going to have to go up in price, so yeah, you are going to see it all over the board, so nobody can keep the prices down because of the prices they are paying right now," Viehl said.