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      Auction in Quincy raises money for a brave young man

      There was a fundraiser for a brave young man in Quincy Sunday.

      It was an auction to raise money for a young boy who suffers from a rare disorder.

      "Through lots of support from friends, from family, through our church, we're able to get the help that we need."

      It's been a heart-wrenching couple of years for Nik and Erica Perry-Broekemeier.

      Their two-year-old son, Sutton, was born with a complication.

      "When Sutton was born, we had a very difficult time getting him to take any foods and any formula," Broekemeier said.

      Nik and his wife took Sutton to multiple hospitals to find an answer.

      "We finally came up with a diagnosis when he was 18 months old -- with CSID, which is congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency," Broekemeier said.

      It's a rare disorder that affects a person's ability to eat certain foods.

      "He lacks the enzyme that a normal person has to break down sucrose, which is table sugar," Broekemeier said.

      It requires Sutton to take medication four times a day.

      However, a few people heard about Sutton's condition and decided they wanted to help.

      Members of the Lutheran Church of St. John came up with a campaign to aid the Broekemeiers.

      "It started at the church. And I got some of my friends at Payson together, and they've done a lot of work with the auction and everything," Jan Fritz, one of the coordinators for the Soldiers for Sutton Benefit said.

      They started the "Soldiers for Sutton Benefit."

      It's a fundraiser to help the Broekemeiers pay for Sutton's medication and hospital bills.

      "We are having a live auction, silent auction with lots of items that have been donated throughout the community, Fritz said.

      Nik couldn't believe people would donate their hard-earned money to help his son.

      He's thankful for all of the people who have given his son a chance at a healthy life.

      "My wife and I talk daily about how we feel and ask ourselves, why, why us? Why do people choose to help us? And the only answer I have is just prayers," Broekemeier said.

      Organizers hope to raise more than $20,000 for Sutton.