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      Attitude toward bully breeds softening?

      When you walk through the doors of the Quincy Humane Society, you'll see the staff and then the first animal you will more than likely see is Phantom.

      When you walk through the doors of the Quincy Humane Society, you'll see the staff and then the first animal you will more than likely see is Phantom.

      Phantom has been at the humane society for almost a year.

      "Awesome dog to adopt, we tell everybody come in here and meet him you know, anybody that sees him in the front room windows, go in there and meet him go in there an play with him, he'll play with you all day long, he's an awesome dog to adopt," Christopher Sprague, Kennel Manager for the Quincy Humane Society said.

      They also say if he was anything but the breed he is, he would have already found a home.

      Phantom is part pit bull, normally considered a bully breed.

      That scares most people away.

      "A lot of people come through, he looks like a pit bull, i don't want a pit bull no no no," Sprague said.

      However, that attitude may be changing.

      Illinois is one of 17 states who have laws against banning breeds, and Missouri may soon join the mix. There is legislation currently making rounds in Missouri's state capital.

      Christopher Sprague and others say you should get to know dogs like Phantom first before you form an opinion.

      "I don't think the right people have came in and looked at him, he is a lover and definitely want to be a cuddle bug, you and just needs someone to love him for who he is even though he is a pit bull breed," Angela Young, Operations Manager for Quincy Humane Society said.

      Across town at the City of Quincy's Animal Shelter, they have more than 10 dogs on site who are considered bully breeds.

      Young also says its all about how you raise the dog and that will determine the rest.

      We posed the question to people in the Tri-States about their feelings toward bully breeds.

      The response was overwhelmingly positive. Most of those who posted agreed with Young its all about how you raise the dog and its the people you should worry about.

      If you'd like to join in the conversation, visit our Facebook page here.

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