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      Anti bullying presentation shocks students

      Pleasant Hill students listen to Phil Chalmers as he talks about bullying.

      One local high school is taking precautions to stop bullying before it happens.

      But are the students receptive?

      "[I've learned] not to bully," said Rebecca Mazzoccoli, Pleasant Hill High School junior. "I've never really been a bully but to just to be nice to your fellow students and treat them with respect."

      Sounds like Rebecca Mazzoccoli got the message. She was just one of the Pleasant Hill High School students that attended an anti-bullying presentation.

      "I think anytime you can bring someone in that they don't know and their interactive and showing videos it kind of hits home," said Ryan Lowe, Pleasant Hill High School principle. "It kind of hits home with them that this stuff is real and it could happen here."

      And that's the exact message Phil Chalmers wanted to get across to the students.

      "Cause a lot of these cases happen in places like this, nice quiet rural small towns," said Phil Chalmers, "Inside the Mind of a Teen Killer," author.

      Chalmers is widely known for his book, which is based off his 25 year study on why teens kill. But he's also recognized as a motivational speaker to teens and specializes in bullying and teen murder. He had students on the edge of their seats with his graphic slides of photos from teen murder crime scenes, true stories on bullying, and an inside look to prison life.

      "The old days we had McGruff the crime dog and we had all these stuffed animals, not today," said Chalmers. "My methods work because you have to get their attention, some of it is shocking but it works."

      "It caught your attention I think is what happened," said Mazzoccoli. "It just made you think and made you wonder and it just made you want to pay attention.

      A shock Mazzoccoli thinks should be given to even younger students.

      "I was thinking that maybe the fifth graders should have come in, because I know that fifth grade was a really bad year for me on bullying so maybe next time this happens bring the fifth graders in too.

      Students from Pleasant Hill High School junior high were also at the presentation.

      If you're interested in having Chalmers speak at your school, click here.