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      Hannibal teen owes life to safety belt

      Hannah says she's alive today because she wore a life-saving seat belt the day of this accident in 2012.

      Sixty percent of the people involved in fatal traffic crashes in Missouri weren't wearing seat belts.

      The Missouri Highway Patrol says many of them were rollover crashes where the person was thrown from the vehicle.

      Hannah Bogue is a busy junior at Hannibal High School. But last year her decision to buckle up changed her life forever - for the better.

      "A car was turning out and hit right into the passenger side where I was sitting," Bogue said. "Without my seat belt I think I probably would have flown right through the window where I was sitting. It was pretty scary."

      She suffered a mild concussion, but walked away from the crash. Click here to watch Bogue explain the crash on KHQA This Morning.

      "You don't have control over situations like that, but I did have control over whether I wore a seat belt," Bogue said.

      Hannah's father and Palmyra Police Chief Eddie Bogue has responded to his share of traffic crashes over the years. He says many people who don't buckle up aren't so lucky. Click here to hear more from Chief Bogue about education efforts underway.

      "When any vehicle rolls over and you're not wearing your seat belt, you have a seven out of ten chance of being killed," Chief Bogue said.

      While it doesn't guarantee survival, belting up and staying inside the car is your best shot for survival in a crash. Engineering Management Expert Mark McNally says car designers work to reinforce the cab of the car or truck ... giving you what experts call "room to live."

      "The main safety feature in the car is the seat belt," McNally said. "The airbags don't work if you aren't belted in. They really work together as a system." Click here to learn more.

      Hannah Bogue says she knows this room to live saved her life and now she's spreading the word through her example.

      "I never let anyone get in my own personal vehicle unless they buckle up," Bogue said. "It's the number one thing when you get into a vehicle."