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      Some residents wait, some leave as Pontoosuc ravaged by flood

      A majority of 4th Street is covered by six inches of water

      Multiple communities across the Tri-States have been hit by recent flooding.

      Almost half of Pontoosuc, Illinois is flooded with around six inches to a foot of water.

      Some residents have decided to pack their bags and move out before the water rises even more.

      "Three times enough, totally enough. I've learned my lesson," Dunn said.

      Bill Dunn has seen this before.

      His community, which is just West of Dallas City and off of Hwy. 96, was flooded in 1993 and once again in 2008.

      "I've been around here for 20 years,?? Dunn said. ??It's enough and it just gets worse and worse every few years."

      Over the weekend, his Pontoosuc home right next to the river, started to flood.

      Every time it floods, his home gets wiped out.

      "We started moving stuff out yesterday, finished a few things today and tomorrow it will be under water," Dunn said.

      Dunn's neighbor, Bob Anderson, was a little more fortunate.

      The area around his home only received about six inches of water.

      "What did it was all of the rains, the heavy rains up north and in Iowa,?? Anderson said. ??Basically, flood the tributaries that flow into the Mississippi."

      He plans to stick around to see if he can wait out the rising tide.

      "Well, until the electric company comes in and shuts the power off," Anderson said.

      "It just keeps coming up, you know. Last year it was 22 and half feet,?? Dunn said. ??This year it's going to be 24 feet. You just ... forget it."

      Dunn plans to leave a for sale sign outside of his house.

      "I'm not coming back. I've done this three times and I ain??t doing it again."

      Another Pontoosuc resident told KHQA that 12 homes were wiped out by the 2008 flood.

      Click here to get additional information about local flooding including links to River Stages, the National Weather Service, FEMA, Road Conditions and more.