68
      Sunday
      86 / 67
      Monday
      89 / 71
      Tuesday
      91 / 70

      Keeping a close eye on Indian Graves

      Precautionary sandbagging efforts at the Indian Graves Levee

      For many communities up and down the Mississippi River it is now a wait and see game.

      All eyes are on the levees and making sure that they hold as the waters continue to rise.

      Concerns over those rising water at the Indian Graves Levee led Adams County Emergency Management Agency Director John Simon to request some additional help from the state.

      A group of inmates from the Illinois Department of Corrections arrived and will spend the next few days filling sandbags.

      "So we have some on stockpile for a response if necessary, for boils or whatever may be necessary while we're in this state of flux and a high river level," Simon said.

      Working alongside John Simon is Illinois Emergency Management Agency Region 6 Coordinator Bob Flemming who says that if there is any blessing with this flooding situation it's the extra lead time the counties had to prepare.

      "We've had two or three days out front to kind of know where its going to crest at," Flemming said. "The county emergency managers and the personnel in the counties are doing a great job of getting their people out there and getting out in front of it. And also being able to provide the situational awareness to the state of Illinois as far as what the long term needs are going to be for personnel and equipment."

      John Simon also agrees with the importance of that lead time in this flood fighting effort.

      "We want to see that lead time because it takes time in order to, particularly if we were to see higher levels than this, it takes time to be able to do pushups and get a large amount of sandbags to be able to respond appropriately," Simon said.

      Bob Flemming says that there are fewer people are impacted by flooding now because of the flood buyouts of 1993 and 2008.

      He also credits the National Weather Service Office of Water Resources and the Army Corps of Engineers for better and earlier warnings that help the state take action earlier against flooding.